Gulet Charter Kos

Kos Gulet Charter Guide Kos Gulet Charter Guide

Endless beaches with turquoise waters; lush vegatation and abundantly flowing streams; ancient and medieval monuments; grand edifices of Italian architecture all come to spell one word: Kos, the third largest island of the Dodecanese Group, only 4 miles away from the coast of Turkey. It is said that the island was named after the daughter of Merops, an ancient king – according to legend – who was also known as Koos. It is the birthplace of Hippocrates, the “Father of Medicine” (460-377 BC).

It has been populated since neolithic times (5th-4th millenium BC). In the 14th c., the Knights Hospitaller of the Order of St John took over the island, strengthened the fortifications of older castles and built new ones. During the Turkish Occupation, the island suffered onslaughts by many invaders (the Knights, the Venetians, etc.). A number of monumental public buildings were constructed during the Italian rule (1912-1945). The island was integrated in Greece in 1948. There is a ferry service to Piraeus harbour and flights to “Eleftherios Venizelos” airport, Athens. Island area: 290 sq. km; coastline: 112 km; population: 31,000.
Kos Town
It is built on the NE edge of the island (population:16,000). It has well-paved, wide roads, large squares and parks with rows of trees. It owes its excellent urban plan to the 1933 earthquake which nearly razed the town to the ground. The Italians who ruled the island at that time rebuilt the town of Kos according to a well thought-out town plan. Its architectural diversity is quite impressive as next to the colonial-style Italian buildings (the Municipal Information Office, the Governor’s Palace, Cultural Centre, “Orpheas” cinema, etc) there are small island-style houses, mosques, walls built by the Knights, modern apartment complexes, and older, restored public buildings.

Kos Map

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